July 31st, 2015

Fantasy football – how green could the beautiful game be?

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by Martine Kurth

 

On Sunday the new football season kicks off, and my husband and I will be tuning in for the traditional curtain raiser, the Community Shield. But while Matthias will be focused on whether his beloved Arsenal can get one over on Chelsea, it won’t just be the goals that are at the forefront of my mind.

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July 24th, 2015

Exchequered past: George Osborne and green taxes

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by Dominic Hogg

 

George Osborne’s July Budget was widely seen as his first opportunity to fully reflect the perspective of the Conservative Party in fiscal policy. The trailers to his speech made it quite clear that the Chancellor would break with the coalition’s approach on environmental taxation. So did the July Budget represent a disastrous departure from green taxation?

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July 22nd, 2015

Broken windows and litter: tidying up INCPEN’s arguments

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by Chris Sherrington

 

The Industry Council on Packaging and the Environment (INCPEN) is putting a lot of effort into communicating the idea that a deposit refund system (DRS) on beverage containers would be ineffective in addressing litter. This line has formed a major part of INCPEN’s response to my recent article highlighting how they cherry-picked litter data for a press release, which has been widely discussed on Twitter. INCPEN’s argument, encapsulated in a tweet, is that:

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July 17th, 2015

High time for an update

The Typing Pool

by the Admin Team

 

Harold Wilson is credited with coining the phrase “A week is a long time in politics”. In that case, the three months since we last provided you with an update on what’s happening on Isonomia must count as an age – especially given the amount of politics that has passed under the bridge in the meantime.

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July 17th, 2015

Why don’t we implement the waste hierarchy?

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by Dominic Hogg

 

Eunomia has been tracking capacity in both residual waste treatment facilities and at anaerobic digestion (AD) facilities in recent years. The lesson of the former is that we may be moving to a situation where we have more capacity than we need by the latter part of the decade. There have been a number of reports indicating the growth in this capacity. They don’t always come out with the same figures, and one of the reasons for this is that they posit different levels of recycling in future. In residual waste, we are dealing with material which it would be reasonable to assume will be diminishing over time if waste and resource management policy is successful.

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July 10th, 2015

Landfilling the void in developing nations

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by Nicole Kennard

 

For many in the western world, landfills carry negative connotations: pungent blots on the landscape, associated with greenhouse gas emissions and risks to groundwater from leachate. The efforts that developed countries are making to reduce our reliance on landfill can give rise to a kneejerk reaction when we think about waste management in developing nations. Shouldn’t we be advocating that they move straight into recycling, composting, biogas and energy from waste, without passing through the landfill phase we’re struggling to end?

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July 3rd, 2015

Taking the wind out of electricity sales

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by Chloe Bines and Adam Baddeley

 

The new Conservative Government has wasted no time in implementing its manifesto pledge to end subsidies for onshore wind. Just six weeks into her tenure as Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, Amber Rudd announced that the Renewable Obligation (RO) would close a year early for onshore wind projects and strongly hinted that action would also be taken to curtail support for the technology under both the small-scale Feed-in Tariff (FiT) and the new Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme for larger scale projects. Meanwhile, the new Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Greg Clark, was busy announcing new planning considerations that will make it significantly harder for onshore wind projects to gain planning consent.

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