October 29th, 2018

Budget breakdown: what would a green chancellor have done?

by Dominic Hogg

 

Economists know that if markets fail to reflect the damages caused by pollution, or to reflect the benefits provided ‘for free’ by nature, then decisions regarding consumption and investment will be misguided.

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October 26th, 2018

Enforcement undertakings: does crime pay?

by Sam Taylor

 

In the four months from February to May this year, around £900,000 was paid to charitable causes by companies in recompense for environmental crimes. These types of payments, known as Enforcement Undertakings (EUs), allow offenders to avoid criminal prosecution by making amends through a civil route. Offenders make voluntary offers to put right the environmental damage they’ve caused, or where that is not possible, make payments to secure compensating benefits or improvements to the environment.

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October 22nd, 2018

Target practice: should recycling targets be weight or carbon-based?

by Peter Jones

 

As the prospect of higher weight-based recycling targets emanating from Europe has moved from a distant possibility to an imminent reality, interest in alternatives to such targets seems to have grown.

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October 12th, 2018

Should horses run on tyres?

by Alice Thomson

 

Horses require year-round exercise even when the conditions outdoors disagree. It’s not that horses particularly mind a bit of mud, but difficult weather conditions can raise the risk of injury and limit options for exercise. The multimillion-pound equestrian industry has adopted technological solutions to address this problem, but those proving most popular raise significant but little-appreciated environmental concerns.

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October 5th, 2018

Sound effects: the problem of sonic litter

by Steve Watson

 

How is a drum and bass banger like a polystyrene takeaway container? Maybe you’re thinking that they’re both most likely encountered at 2am on a Friday night down the town centre. But I’m more concerned about their presence down residential streets during waking hours. In fact, I’m thinking both should be considered forms of environmental pollution.

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September 28th, 2018

The circular economy: inspiration or buzz phrase?

by Caroline Campbell

 

Is the circular economy something new, or is it just the latest buzz phrase? And how much does this matter when we start trying to apply its resource management principles in practice?

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September 21st, 2018

Beyond Petroleum or Boosting Production? BP’s sustainability goals

by Alexander Boden

 

Businesses – especially energy businesses – have a huge role to play in limiting global warming. The combustion of oil-based fuels accounts for more than 50% of GHG emissions in industrialised countries. It’s hard to see a path to keeping global warming to below 2°C without fossil fuel companies committing to major changes in their business models. So, let’s look at what is being done by the world’s sixth largest oil and gas company, BP, which enjoys something of a green reputation.

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