July 17th, 2015

Why don’t we implement the waste hierarchy?

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by Dominic Hogg

 

Eunomia has been tracking capacity in both residual waste treatment facilities and at anaerobic digestion (AD) facilities in recent years. The lesson of the former is that we may be moving to a situation where we have more capacity than we need by the latter part of the decade. There have been a number of reports indicating the growth in this capacity. They don’t always come out with the same figures, and one of the reasons for this is that they posit different levels of recycling in future. In residual waste, we are dealing with material which it would be reasonable to assume will be diminishing over time if waste and resource management policy is successful.

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July 10th, 2015

Landfilling the void in developing nations

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by Nicole Kennard

 

For many in the western world, landfills carry negative connotations: pungent blots on the landscape, associated with greenhouse gas emissions and risks to groundwater from leachate. The efforts that developed countries are making to reduce our reliance on landfill can give rise to a kneejerk reaction when we think about waste management in developing nations. Shouldn’t we be advocating that they move straight into recycling, composting, biogas and energy from waste, without passing through the landfill phase we’re struggling to end?

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June 19th, 2015

Is the LGA right about EfW overcapacity?

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by Adam Baddeley and Peter Jones

 

Eunomia has been publicly warning for four years now that the UK’s “dash for trash” will leave us – like Sweden, the Netherlands and some of our other Northern European neighbours – with more residual waste infrastructure than we really need.

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May 29th, 2015

Pickles’ parting shot

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by Joe Papineschi and Gwen Frost

 

I suspect that the departure of Eric Pickles from the role of Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government will not be widely mourned amongst council officials. His replacement, Greg Clark, had a previous stint as minister of state in the department between 2010 and 2012, and subsequently held the cities brief. While it may be too early to pronounce with confidence that a major change of approach is in the air, Clark is a strong advocate of decentralisation of power, and might reinvigorate the localism agenda that fell by the wayside as Pickles increasingly sought to bend councils to his will.

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May 8th, 2015

Expressing irritation: more media complaints

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By Peter Jones

 

It seems that ill-founded negative stories about recycling have become something of a staple for certain sections of England’s press. However, when I read the rubbish written about resources, I have a hard time letting it go, which is turning me into a bit of a serial complainer – not a role I rejoice in, although I hope it’s a useful one. Having previously persuaded the Daily Mail and Daily Telegraph to withdraw articles, the latest titles to incur my ire were the Sunday and Daily Express.

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April 10th, 2015

Transitioning to a circular economy

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by Ad Lansink

 

For a society accustomed to the achievements of a linear economy, the transition to a circular system is a hard task even to contemplate. Although the changes needed may seem daunting, it is important to remember that we have already come a long way. However, the history of the waste hierarchy has taught that political perseverance and unity of approach are essential to achieving long term visions in supply chain management.

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March 3rd, 2015

UK marine litter measures: a list as long as your arm?

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by Chiarina Darrah

 

It’s taken several years of sustained campaigning to bring marine litter onto the agenda, backed up by strategic work at the global and regional level by organisations like the UN, Regional Seas Programmes, the European Commission, national governments, and many others.

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