June 8th, 2018

Great expectations? Predicted and real results of three-weekly collections

 by Maxine von Eye and Tanguy Tomes

 

When controversial three-weekly bin collections first appeared on the scene, it posed an interesting problem for waste managers. How do you predict the effect that a reduction in collection frequency will have when there’s no pool of past experience into which you can dip?

Read more on Great expectations? Predicted and real results of three-weekly collections…


April 27th, 2018

Bad news: why journalists get the environment wrong

by Mike Brown

 

Listening to BBC Radio 4’s Today programme earlier this year, I heard an interviewer premise a question by saying that coffee cups weren’t really disposable because they couldn’t be recycled. Read that again – it makes no sense however you look at it. While it betrays a pretty weak grasp of what “disposable” means, in itself it’s a fairly harmless blunder – but it led to me to reflect on how often media outlets, even those you might regard as ‘quality media’, get things wrong on environment issues, and the impact that this has.

Read more on Bad news: why journalists get the environment wrong…


April 20th, 2018

Spending review: what waste management costs councils

by Peter Jones

 

Last month the National Audit Office (NAO) published an assessment of the financial sustainability of English local authorities. Some of the findings were pretty stark, with the NAO reporting that “spending on services has fallen by 19.2% in real terms” since 2010/11, with expenditure on areas other than social care falling by 32.6%. The NAO further stated that:

Read more on Spending review: what waste management costs councils…


March 16th, 2018

Cairo practice: the changing role of the informal sector in waste

by Bernadette Simpson

 

Egypt is the country with the 7th most mismanaged plastic waste, according to a report published in Science magazine. The report was based on data collected in 2010 and one must wonder whether the findings would have been different if the capital’s informal waste collectors, the ‘zabbaleen’, had been allowed to continue their work unhindered.

Read more on Cairo practice: the changing role of the informal sector in waste…


March 2nd, 2018

Packet loss: litter and packaging in the Philippines

by Amy Slack

 

It’s been two months since I stepped back into Bristolian life after spending five months working with Marine Conservation Philippines (MCP), trying to find local solutions to the global issue of marine plastics. Being at the coal face of an issue that has been the focus of a significant amount of attention recently makes you acutely aware of the enormous scale of the challenge – but also of the real scope for action to address it.

Read more on Packet loss: litter and packaging in the Philippines…


February 23rd, 2018

Avoidable confusion: the unwelcome return of TEEP

by Bethany Ledingham

 

The government’s long-awaited 25 year environment plan (25YEP) received a pretty lukewarm response when it was published in January: good as far as it went, but short on ambition, detail and money. Michael Gove may have outdone his predecessors by actually getting the 25YEP published, but it doesn’t seem that he managed to inject much new life into a document that Theresa May is said to have once ordered to be as boring as possible.

Read more on Avoidable confusion: the unwelcome return of TEEP…


February 16th, 2018

Institutional failure? Environmental health and monthly bin collections

by Peter Jones

 

Last week, the Daily Express ran a story warning of the dire consequences of the planned introduction of monthly residual waste collections in Conwy, North Wales. Reducing collection frequencies would lead to a variety of ills such as swarms of rats and flies, unpleasant odours and a surge in fly-tipping, the paper claimed.

Read more on Institutional failure? Environmental health and monthly bin collections…