June 16th, 2017

Sustainable apparel will come only from industry-wide change

by Mary Hable

 

In 2010, fresh out of college with a degree in economics, I began a new job as a corporate sustainability professional at a major apparel retailer. I was hopeful. The apparel industry was full of environmental problems and opportunities for major progress.

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March 17th, 2017

Current electrics: WEEE and the circular economy

by Mary Biron-Tolentino

 

The UK is one of the world’s biggest spenders on consumer electronics. According to WRAP, British households and businesses buy around 1.4 million tonnes of electrical and electronic equipment each year.  In financial terms, average spending is around £800 per household, and this continues to grow, despite economic uncertainties and slow wage growth. Looking just at consumer electronics, the market is reported to have growing by almost 10% per annum from 2010-2014, and was estimated to be around £4.4 billion in 2016.

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December 21st, 2016

Alcohol problem: the environmental impacts of beer

by Alice Walton

 

Most of us enjoy a pint or two at Christmas time. Whether we’re letting our hair down at the work Christmas party or meeting up with family and friends down the local pub, and whether it’s an ale to warm the cockles on a cold winter’s night or a cool lager to rouse us from a pudding-induced nap, over the holiday season the idea of a nice pint of beer may often come to the forefront of our minds.

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September 16th, 2016

Released without charge: inside England’s carrier bag data

by Steve Watson

 

Back in July, six months after England adopted a five pence charge on single use plastic bags (SUPBs), the government released the first data showing how the measure has affected consumption. The headline figure reported in the media was a reduction of 83%, which looks like a fantastic result – especially considering that Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland reported smaller reductions of 76%, 80% and 71% in the first years of their respective bans.

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May 13th, 2016

United in life and death: Maurice Strong and Mostafa Tolba

by Steve Watson

 

Within the past six months, the environmental community – and for that matter the planet – has lost two of its most influential champions. Maurice Strong, who passed away in November 2015, and Mostafa Tolba, who died this March, were both active on the world stage in the earliest days of the environmental movement as key figures in the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP).

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April 15th, 2016

Is there a clear vision for environmentally responsible eyewear?

by Amy Slack

 

A time comes in a lot of people’s lives when things start to become a bit blurry. Realising it’s not simply the side effect of a heavy night out, you take the dreaded trip to the opticians and discover that you no longer have perfect eye-sight and would benefit from corrective eyewear. Since that moment in my early 20s, my eyesight has very slowly been getting worse, my prescription changing slightly about every two years. I recently had my annual eye test and, predictably, was told that my prescription had once again changed: I now have astigmatism – great!

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April 8th, 2016

The sweet hereafter: implications of the UK’s sugar tax

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by Dominic Hogg and Luke Dale-Harris

 

The proposal for a Soft Drinks Industry Levy to start in 2018 was an eye-catching announcement in the midst of an otherwise disappointing Budget last month – the sugar-free icing on a particularly grim cake. But it didn’t take long before the fizzy drinks industry was up and fighting the ‘sugar tax’, threatening legal action against the government for damaging their corner of the market.

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