August 12th, 2016

Turning up the heat on energy strategy

Pilot Light

by Adam Baddeley and Rob Reid

 

Although heating accounts for almost 50% of UK total energy consumption, it remains strangely absent from the renewable energy debate. Former Energy and Climate Change Secretary Amber Rudd brought it up last November, but only as a begrudging admission that slow progress was putting us way off track to meet 2020’s 15% Renewable Energy Directive (RED) target. Yet just a week later, Rudd’s ‘policy reset’ speech contained no major goals on renewable heat – instead, it signalled renewed support for gas to replace coal-fired electricity generation backed by streamlined regulatory and consenting requirements for hydraulic fracturing.

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June 17th, 2016

What’s in store? An energy storage update

Image of a battery

by Chloe Bines and Adam Baddeley

 

In January, Eunomia published the first UK forecast for battery storage, which estimated that deployment could reach over 1.6GW by 2020. It generated a good deal of interest, with a range of organisations keen to understand how the forecast was produced. Now, six months on, there’s a new question – is the forecast still relevant?

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June 3rd, 2016

What now for large-scale biomass?

Prawn farm

by Adam Baddeley

 

The last decade has seen a dramatic rise in the UK’s use of biomass to generate energy – both electricity and heat. However, as concerns have grown that – under some scenarios – biomass does not deliver cost-effective reductions in carbon emissions compared with other renewable technologies (i.e. it has higher ‘marginal abatement cost’ for CO2), there has been a bit of a cooling off from the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC). So, what is the future for large-scale biomass in the UK?

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August 7th, 2015

Crash and burn: what overcapacity means for UK EfW

by Chris Cullen and Adam Baddeley

 

Many people in the waste sector have spent their careers managing seemingly ever-increasing quantities of residual waste. Efforts over the last fifteen years have focused on diverting it away from landfill. For those grappling with this problem, it can be difficult to believe that we’re rapidly approaching a point where we’ll be worrying about a lack of residual waste to feed the treatment facilities we’ve built to achieve this goal.

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July 3rd, 2015

Taking the wind out of electricity sales

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by Chloe Bines and Adam Baddeley

 

The new Conservative Government has wasted no time in implementing its manifesto pledge to end subsidies for onshore wind. Just six weeks into her tenure as Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, Amber Rudd announced that the Renewable Obligation (RO) would close a year early for onshore wind projects and strongly hinted that action would also be taken to curtail support for the technology under both the small-scale Feed-in Tariff (FiT) and the new Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme for larger scale projects. Meanwhile, the new Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Greg Clark, was busy announcing new planning considerations that will make it significantly harder for onshore wind projects to gain planning consent.

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June 19th, 2015

Is the LGA right about EfW overcapacity?

by Adam Baddeley and Peter Jones

 

Eunomia has been publicly warning for four years now that the UK’s “dash for trash” will leave us – like Sweden, the Netherlands and some of our other Northern European neighbours – with more residual waste infrastructure than we really need.

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January 9th, 2015

Setting great store by renewable electricity

by Chloe Bines and Adam Baddeley

 

Under the EU Renewable Energy Directive (RED), the UK is legally committed to delivering 15% of its energy demand from renewable energy sources by 2020. Achieving this ambitious target will require a substantial decarbonisation of the energy system and the UK Renewable Energy Roadmap published by DECC set a target for 13GW of installed onshore wind turbines by 2020, 18GW of offshore wind and as much as 20GW of solar PV.

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