August 7th, 2015

Crash and burn: what overcapacity means for UK EfW

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by Chris Cullen and Adam Baddeley

 

Many people in the waste sector have spent their careers managing seemingly ever-increasing quantities of residual waste. Efforts over the last fifteen years have focused on diverting it away from landfill. For those grappling with this problem, it can be difficult to believe that we’re rapidly approaching a point where we’ll be worrying about a lack of residual waste to feed the treatment facilities we’ve built to achieve this goal.

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July 3rd, 2015

Taking the wind out of electricity sales

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by Chloe Bines and Adam Baddeley

 

The new Conservative Government has wasted no time in implementing its manifesto pledge to end subsidies for onshore wind. Just six weeks into her tenure as Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, Amber Rudd announced that the Renewable Obligation (RO) would close a year early for onshore wind projects and strongly hinted that action would also be taken to curtail support for the technology under both the small-scale Feed-in Tariff (FiT) and the new Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme for larger scale projects. Meanwhile, the new Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Greg Clark, was busy announcing new planning considerations that will make it significantly harder for onshore wind projects to gain planning consent.

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June 19th, 2015

Is the LGA right about EfW overcapacity?

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by Adam Baddeley and Peter Jones

 

Eunomia has been publicly warning for four years now that the UK’s “dash for trash” will leave us – like Sweden, the Netherlands and some of our other Northern European neighbours – with more residual waste infrastructure than we really need.

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January 9th, 2015

Setting great store by renewable electricity

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by Chloe Bines and Adam Baddeley

 

Under the EU Renewable Energy Directive (RED), the UK is legally committed to delivering 15% of its energy demand from renewable energy sources by 2020. Achieving this ambitious target will require a substantial decarbonisation of the energy system and the UK Renewable Energy Roadmap published by DECC set a target for 13GW of installed onshore wind turbines by 2020, 18GW of offshore wind and as much as 20GW of solar PV.

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July 18th, 2014

CfD FiTs: CHP-ing away at DECC’s biomass strategy?

Photo by Rick Kimpel, via Wikimedia Commons.

by Adam Baddeley

 

Is the Government’s approach to the use of biomass to meet our power needs in danger of being subverted? The renewable energy sector is a dense thicket of acronyms, denoting the range of subsidies and contracting mechanisms being used to provide support to the various technologies being used to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. In the case of biomass, there appears to be a real risk that both investors and the Government may be uncertain about the overall effect of these complex rules, which risk undermining the policy position that has been settled on.

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March 14th, 2014

Is bad data blocking waste infrastructure investment?

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by Adam Baddeley and Chris Cullen

 

We’ve been reading SITA’s recent report on waste arisings and infrastructure, which found that by 2025 the UK would have 5.7m tonnes more waste than treatment capacity. It’s a conclusion that we have issues with: we’re authors of Eunomia’s Residual Waste Infrastructure Review, which has consistently shown that the capacity of the incinerators, MBT plants and other residual treatment plant that we expect to be built in coming years risks exceeding the tonnage of waste which will need to be managed in future. But whilst it’s worth pausing to point out where we think SITA has erred, the report raises a more interesting issue: what is really holding up the infrastructure investment that SITA and others think is so urgently needed?

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January 24th, 2014

Difficult to digest: problems with the C&I food waste market

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by Hattie Parke and Adam Baddeley

 

How well is the anaerobic digestion (AD) market developing in the UK? It’s a question that should concern not just investors and developers, but also policy makers and anyone else who wants to see more food waste treated higher up the waste hierarchy.

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