January 13th, 2017

Multiple points: in favour of fishing hook restrictions

by Stuart McLanaghan

 

For many, angling represents a life-long passion that starts at childhood and continues throughout adult-life, where some claim to experience a connection with our more primeval hunter-gatherer instincts. Angling is one of our biggest recreational activities – a 2010 survey indicated 4.2 million people in England and Wales had been freshwater fishing over the previous two years. However, in an increasingly conservation and animal welfare conscious world, the common use of multiple point fishing hooks stands out as angling’s Achilles’ heel.

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November 6th, 2015

Hitting the bottle: the Middle East’s water packaging problem

by Rehan Ahmed

 

Plastic water bottles are a common feature of urban life in the Middle East, being readily and cheaply available to all sections of society. In some instances, they are even provided free in public locations such as mosques, and this easy availability has seen their use – and subsequent misuse – increase greatly over time. People have come to regard plastic water bottles as a free resource, taking bottles, sipping from them, and leaving them in public places or throwing them away in rubbish bins with their contents only partly consumed.

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May 1st, 2015

Scotland’s highly prized marine environment

by Thomas Appleby

 

Sometimes life’s journey throws up events which are so unusual you have to pinch yourself to believe what is actually unfolding.

Most of us can dream up any amount of excuses not to do things. Many of us do things but fall short of our ambitions. A very few have the ability not just to meet their ambitions but to bring others with them and of those an even smaller subset are genuinely altruistic in their determination. We should celebrate and treasure these people, but often we are too stuck in our daily grind to take time out and besides the British are uniquely awkward with the word ‘hero’.

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March 27th, 2015

Stemming the tide of plastic bags

By Sarah Baulch

 

True horror lies not in crumbling Gothic graveyards or the trappings of midnight movies but in the disturbing implications of mundane things. Having spent years researching the impacts of marine debris and long hours looking at pictures of creatures with plastic clogging their stomachs, now when I stand in a supermarket queue and see an endless tide of plastic bags flow from the checkouts to the world beyond all I can think about is where those bags are going to end up.

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March 6th, 2015

Water quality: a fishy business

by Thomas Appleby

 

It is easy to assume that it was public pressure which forced the Victorians in the UK to clean up the UK’s over-polluted 19th century waterways. But while that was partly true it is not the whole story.

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March 3rd, 2015

UK marine litter measures: a list as long as your arm?

by Chiarina Darrah

 

It’s taken several years of sustained campaigning to bring marine litter onto the agenda, backed up by strategic work at the global and regional level by organisations like the UN, Regional Seas Programmes, the European Commission, national governments, and many others.

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October 17th, 2014

Burning rubber: the problem of tyre-fuelled kilns

by Catherine Hansen

 

The decorative arts of ceramics and pottery have a long and honoured tradition. Whilst we cannot know exactly when the first kilns were built and the first clay fired, some very early examples of pottery have been unearthed in the Middle East, with the most ancient pottery fragments found at Catal Huyuk in Turkey dating from as long ago as 6500BC.

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