September 25th, 2015

Getting in on the ACT: subsidies and the EfW market


by Chris Cullen


The market for residual waste treatment is about to experience some significant changes. As we move closer to the point where Eunomia’s Residual Waste Infrastructure Review forecasts suggest that the amount of treatment capacity will equal the amount of residual waste available, the key price benchmark for facilities will no longer be the cost of landfill. Instead, it will be the gate fee offered by operators of other residual waste treatment plant – many of them energy from waste (EfW) facilities. A key question for any developer, then, is what will allow a facility to be competitive over its lifespan of 25 years or more.

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July 10th, 2015

Landfilling the void in developing nations


by Nicole Kennard


For many in the western world, landfills carry negative connotations: pungent blots on the landscape, associated with greenhouse gas emissions and risks to groundwater from leachate. The efforts that developed countries are making to reduce our reliance on landfill can give rise to a kneejerk reaction when we think about waste management in developing nations. Shouldn’t we be advocating that they move straight into recycling, composting, biogas and energy from waste, without passing through the landfill phase we’re struggling to end?

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June 19th, 2015

Is the LGA right about EfW overcapacity?


by Adam Baddeley and Peter Jones


Eunomia has been publicly warning for four years now that the UK’s “dash for trash” will leave us – like Sweden, the Netherlands and some of our other Northern European neighbours – with more residual waste infrastructure than we really need.

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March 20th, 2015

Talking GIB-berish


by Dominic Hogg


We’ve now had more than two years of the Green Investment Bank (GIB), enough time to take a view on how green its intervention in the waste sector has been. It won’t be a surprise to hear that the answer is “not very”, but much more interesting to ask why.

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January 9th, 2015

Setting great store by renewable electricity


by Chloe Bines and Adam Baddeley


Under the EU Renewable Energy Directive (RED), the UK is legally committed to delivering 15% of its energy demand from renewable energy sources by 2020. Achieving this ambitious target will require a substantial decarbonisation of the energy system and the UK Renewable Energy Roadmap published by DECC set a target for 13GW of installed onshore wind turbines by 2020, 18GW of offshore wind and as much as 20GW of solar PV.

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October 17th, 2014

Is the waste PFI credit crunch justified?

Residual Graph

by Dominic Hogg


I’ve just made it back to the office following a thoroughly enjoyable LARAC conference. As well as staying up way too late on Wednesday night after a scrumptious dinner, I sat on a panel earlier in the same day which was asked a question regarding whether the withdrawal of PFI credits from various local authority waste projects was justified.

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September 26th, 2014

Landfill gas: taxable commodity or a potent pollutant?


by Chris Eden


Spanish renewable energy policy has always been a broad brush affair, with a wide range of different technologies lumped into the same basket. Indeed, one area where Spain has been quite successful is a form of energy that some might not even call renewable: biogas, specifically landfill biogas. This gas is essentially a by-product of the process of degradation of organic material, such as food garden or animal waste, which both EU law and environmental ideals would keep well away from landfill.

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