May 27th, 2014

Withdrawal symptoms: why Defra still has a role in waste

Incin-Recyc Graph_SML

by Dominic Hogg

 

How is England performing on waste management, and what are the prospects for the future? Last year, Defra announced its intention to step back in areas of waste management where businesses are better placed to act and there is no clear market failure. Now the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (EFRA) Committee has launched an inquiry examining approaches to the recycling and treatment of municipal waste in England, and the impact of the reduction of Defra’s activities.

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January 24th, 2014

Difficult to digest: problems with the C&I food waste market

640px-Trashed_vegetables_in_Luxembourg

by Hattie Parke and Adam Baddeley

 

How well is the anaerobic digestion (AD) market developing in the UK? It’s a question that should concern not just investors and developers, but also policy makers and anyone else who wants to see more food waste treated higher up the waste hierarchy.

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October 9th, 2012

Exports: a waste of energy?

Container ship Hanjin Taipei

by Adam Baddeley

 

An article by one my colleagues last year set out an intelligent case for the export of waste from the UK for use as fuel in other European Union (EU) Member States, particularly highlighting that this need not be just a short-term fix. But the debate rumbles on, and has begun to take new forms, so I thought I would examine the numbers and see how the case for retaining our refuse derived fuel (RDF), also known as solid recovered fuel (SRF), for incineration in the UK, stacks up.

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September 6th, 2012

Reshuffling the waste hierarchy

Owen Paterson

by Phillip Ward

 

It will no doubt take Owen Paterson a few days to uncover all the issues Caroline Spelman left in his in-tray.

One which has dipped under the radar is the promised revised guidance on applying the waste hierarchy.  Whilst it has been around for a long time, the hierarchy assumes greater significance now that the revised Waste Framework Directive gives its prioritisation of methods of waste treatment a statutory basis. Last year it was enshrined in England and Wales regulations that are now in force. Anyone creating or handling waste is already obliged to follow the hierarchy (Prevention, Preparing for Reuse, Recycling, Recovery or Disposal) and penalties can be imposed if they fail to do so. However, the guidance is a critical tool to enable the hierarchy to be applied in practice.

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July 20th, 2012

Collectors hold the key

Tokyo Key

by Joe Papineschi

 

A few weeks ago I went to a great little event hosted by LG Legal at their HQ next to Boris’s City Hall that brought together leading players in the Anaerobic Digestion (AD) industry. I started writing about it in an initial fit of inspiration on the last train back to Bristol, while the debate (chaired by BBC Science Correspondent David Shukman), the good dinner, and several glasses of wine were still in my system.  Unfortunately after about a page of ranting I had typed myself to sleep, and only in the last couple of days has my screed come to light. Amazingly, I think I hit on a point that remains worth making – one which, if the leading players took it on board, would transform the economics of AD.

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April 27th, 2012

Do votes grow on trees?

Mayor of London

by  Rob Gillies

 

The biggest job in UK local government is up for grabs on May 3rd, as voters hit the polls for the London Mayoral election. Whilst it may not quite match the razzmatazz of the US democratic process, it has thrown up one or two highlights. You may have seen Peter Jones’s comparison of the green policies of the would-be Republican nominees – in the same spirit, what do the mayoral candidates have to offer an environmentally minded Londoner?

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November 30th, 2011

Slurry seems to be the hardest word

Peter Jones

by Peter Jones

 

A talk by Helen Browning, CEO of the Soil Association, on 2 November left me pondering the problems of farming and waste.  Helen is a compelling speaker and, despite battling the after-effects of a cold, tackled a lot of topics with energy and thoughtfulness.

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