June 30th, 2017

Is recycling confusing?

by Peter Jones and Joe Papineschi

 

There’s one thing everyone seems to agree on regarding recycling: it’s confusing. It’s a familiar complaint from countless press articles and broadcast pieces; when surveyed, people say they find recycling confusing; and Defra has taken up the theme. Part of the rationale for WRAP’s consistency programme is to ‘help address confusion’ by encouraging greater uniformity in councils’ recycling services.

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June 23rd, 2017

Will Brexit bust the RDF export market?

by Ian Cessford, Bethany Ledingham and Peter Jones

 

Deprived of a majority by the general election earlier this month, the UK Government faces some difficult arithmetic when it eventually tries to secure Parliamentary approval for any deal on the country’s future relationship with the EU. Even if the Prime Minister can find a deal that is supported by both the ‘europhile’ and the ‘eurosceptic’ wings of the Conservative Party, it will also need the backing of the DUP – or other opposition MPs – if it is to command a majority. It is not in a position to force through whatever deal it reaches.

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June 2nd, 2017

Myth takes: it’s greener to incinerate paper than recycle it

by Peter Jones

 

When people want to argue that this whole recycling lark has gone a bit too far, they often regurgitate a peculiar factoid: that, on a careful analysis of the pros and cons, incinerating waste paper and card to generate energy has greater environmental benefits than recycling it.

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April 28th, 2017

Myth takes – “Separate streams need separate containers”

by Peter Jones

 

One of the recurring claims in the tabloid press coverage of waste and recycling issues is that if local authorities collect more separate streams of recycling, it means householders having to separate each waste stream into a different container. The view in the popular press is typically that, if householders have to do more source separation it will result in dissatisfaction, confusion, and more contaminated recycling. It’s a view that has little basis in reality.

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March 31st, 2017

What does it mean to be an ethical environmental consultant?

by Peter Jones

 

Despite the bad press they sometimes get, I’d like to think that it isn’t an oxymoron to be an ethical consultant. Certainly, anyone who became an environmental consultant solely for the glittering financial rewards wouldn’t stay in the sector all that long, and many do the job at least in part due to a desire to make the world a greener place.

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February 24th, 2017

Separate ways: a commercial waste case study

by Nick Stott and Peter Jones

 

It’s now a little over two years since the separate collection requirements under the amended Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2011 took effect. For waste collectors, this made it compulsory to ensure that, if they were collecting paper, metals, plastics or glass, they did so by way of separate collection – subject to the rather hard to interpret condition that separation is ‘necessary’ and ‘practicable’ (‘TEEP’).

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February 3rd, 2017

Down on recycling: England’s recycling rate

by Peter Jones

 

The recent downtick in England’s household recycling rate has led to wailing and gnashing of teeth in some quarters, and something more like gloating in others. However, there has been little examination of what the numbers tell us about what underlies the change, and thus the appropriate policy responses.

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