January 26th, 2017

What do Scots toss?

by Chris Sherrington

 

What are people most likely to litter? This is a surprisingly tricky question to answer, as the data on litter is poor. However, if we want to have effective policies to reduce littering, it’s important to understand the behaviours we need to change, and the scale of the impact they could achieve.

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November 25th, 2016

Less rotting in the state of Denmark?

by Sarah Ettlinger

 

Copenhagen’s second ‘Wefood’ surplus food supermarket opened on Monday 7th November. Products in the shop are donated, for example due to damaged packaging or being close to or past best-before dates, and sold at 50-70% below the market price. The expansion builds on the success of the first Wefood, which received more than 25 tonnes of donations in the first three months after it opened in February. Both stores are run by DanChurchAid and staffed by volunteers.

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August 12th, 2016

Turning up the heat on energy strategy

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by Adam Baddeley and Rob Reid

 

Although heating accounts for almost 50% of UK total energy consumption, it remains strangely absent from the renewable energy debate. Former Energy and Climate Change Secretary Amber Rudd brought it up last November, but only as a begrudging admission that slow progress was putting us way off track to meet 2020’s 15% Renewable Energy Directive (RED) target. Yet just a week later, Rudd’s ‘policy reset’ speech contained no major goals on renewable heat – instead, it signalled renewed support for gas to replace coal-fired electricity generation backed by streamlined regulatory and consenting requirements for hydraulic fracturing.

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July 29th, 2016

Ought we to protect the environment?

by Peter Jones

 

Can we say that we ought to protect the environment? Is there a moral obligation on us to do so? In other words, is environmentalism a branch of ethics?

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April 22nd, 2016

Putting the ‘Right Waste’ in the ‘Right Place’

by Sam Corp

 

It is unfortunate and disappointing that, according to statistics collected by Suez, 56% of SME waste producers are not currently complying with their waste Duty of Care. Causes of non compliance range from not giving consideration to the waste hierarchy or separate collection requirements under the Waste Regulations, to storing waste materials incorrectly, to mixing hazardous and or hygiene wastes in with general waste.

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April 8th, 2016

The sweet hereafter: implications of the UK’s sugar tax

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by Dominic Hogg and Luke Dale-Harris

 

The proposal for a Soft Drinks Industry Levy to start in 2018 was an eye-catching announcement in the midst of an otherwise disappointing Budget last month – the sugar-free icing on a particularly grim cake. But it didn’t take long before the fizzy drinks industry was up and fighting the ‘sugar tax’, threatening legal action against the government for damaging their corner of the market.

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December 11th, 2015

Neat Streets: making fun of anti-litter interventions?

by Chris Sherrington

 

Over the past few months an organisation called Hubbub has been carrying out a series of ‘playful’ localised anti-litter interventions in London. Their project, called Neat Streets, was focused on Villiers Street in Westminster, one of the busiest in the capital in terms of footfall. Funding was provided by organisations including INCPEN (the Industry Council for research on Packaging and the Environment), the Packaging Federation, the Metal Packaging Association, the Packaging and Films Association, Lucozade Ribena Suntory and Coca Cola.

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