November 6th, 2015

Hitting the bottle: the Middle East’s water packaging problem

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by Rehan Ahmed

 

Plastic water bottles are a common feature of urban life in the Middle East, being readily and cheaply available to all sections of society. In some instances, they are even provided free in public locations such as mosques, and this easy availability has seen their use – and subsequent misuse – increase greatly over time. People have come to regard plastic water bottles as a free resource, taking bottles, sipping from them, and leaving them in public places or throwing them away in rubbish bins with their contents only partly consumed.

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October 30th, 2015

Unnatural ways: a monster movie special

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by Steve Watson

 

Where would Halloween be without a monster movie? It may be difficult sometimes to look behind the shlock and gore, especially if you’re watching from behind the sofa, but for the environmentally minded viewer this genre can often reveal an interesting analysis of concerns we deal with day in, day out.

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October 23rd, 2015

Should we welcome the return of nappy recycling?

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by Hilary Vick

 

The news that nappy recycling specialist Knowaste is looking to open a new facility will receive rather a lukewarm welcome – at least from those of us engaged in trying to minimise the environmental impact of nappies by promoting reusables. Their plan, submitted on 14th September, is for a new absorbent hygiene product (AHP) recycling plant in West London, which would take in disposable nappies, adult incontinence and feminine hygiene products, using autoclave and shredding technology to recover plastics and fibres for recycling.

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October 16th, 2015

Cash on collection: selling separated recyclables

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by Peter Jones and Joe Papineschi

 

Local authority budgets are slimmer than ever, making it imperative for councils that separately collect materials to achieve the best possible value from them. However, while councils are experienced purchasers of goods and services, selling isn’t something they have much call to do.

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October 9th, 2015

Posting the bans: can we ban EPS packaging?

Train Burger

by Ayesha Bapasola

 

One is the city that never sleeps; the other is famed for its dreaming spires – but both have had a nightmare of a time trying to proactively tackle waste and litter.

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October 2nd, 2015

On tape: regulation in the waste sector

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by Peter Jones

 

Last month, the Cabinet Office concluded its call for comments to help it “identify unnecessary barriers to growth and productivity in the waste sector”. I responded, as did many others in the sector, and judging by some of the comments posted on its web page I wasn’t alone in finding the red tape review somewhat misconceived. I would argue that the waste and recycling sector, far from being strangled by regulation and enforcement, relies upon it for its survival, let alone its growth.

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September 25th, 2015

Getting in on the ACT: subsidies and the EfW market

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by Chris Cullen

 

The market for residual waste treatment is about to experience some significant changes. As we move closer to the point where Eunomia’s Residual Waste Infrastructure Review forecasts suggest that the amount of treatment capacity will equal the amount of residual waste available, the key price benchmark for facilities will no longer be the cost of landfill. Instead, it will be the gate fee offered by operators of other residual waste treatment plant – many of them energy from waste (EfW) facilities. A key question for any developer, then, is what will allow a facility to be competitive over its lifespan of 25 years or more.

Read more on Getting in on the ACT: subsidies and the EfW market…