July 13th, 2018

A mug’s game? Choosing how to manage waste coffee grounds

by Peter Jones

 

What is the best environmental option for dealing with spent coffee grounds (SCGs)? Defra’s statutory guidance on the waste hierarchy is quite clear that anaerobic digestion (AD) is the preferred option for food waste, it is perhaps a question that should not need to be asked.

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July 6th, 2018

Is it time to switch to biodegradable plastics?

by Mark Hilton and Peter Jones

 

It seems as though the impact plastics have on the environment has gone from a niche concern to mainstream matter quicker than you can say “Blue Planet”. Suddenly, consumers and businesses alike are taking action. But while concern has ramped up, knowledge still lags behind and there is a risk of ineffective or counterproductive changes being adopted.

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November 20th, 2015

Separate biowaste collections: a TEEP learning curve?

by Peter Jones

 

Details are starting to emerge of the forthcoming European Commission Circular Economy package proposal, now expected early in the New Year. If the leaks are accurate, and the package is translated into a directive in something like its current form, there will be a great deal of thinking to do – first for officials at Defra, and then for anyone involved in collecting waste that contains biowaste.

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August 28th, 2015

Waste hierarchy compliance: a tick box exercise?

by Sam Taylor and Peter Jones

 

The waste hierarchy is one of the fundamental elements of the European waste management policy. Enshrined in the Waste Framework Directive, and transposed into UK law in the Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2011 (‘the 2011 Regulations’), applying the waste hierarchy is a legal duty on all producers of waste. But with little threat of enforcement of this obligation, many businesses in the UK seem unmotivated to act and compliance appears to be literally no more than a tick box exercise.

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July 17th, 2015

Why don’t we implement the waste hierarchy?

by Dominic Hogg

 

Eunomia has been tracking capacity in both residual waste treatment facilities and at anaerobic digestion (AD) facilities in recent years. The lesson of the former is that we may be moving to a situation where we have more capacity than we need by the latter part of the decade. There have been a number of reports indicating the growth in this capacity. They don’t always come out with the same figures, and one of the reasons for this is that they posit different levels of recycling in future. In residual waste, we are dealing with material which it would be reasonable to assume will be diminishing over time if waste and resource management policy is successful.

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February 7th, 2014

Don’t pooh-pooh pet waste

Recycling Cat crop

by Steve Watson

 

When I took my first step onto the property ladder last summer, I thought it would also help my ascent of Lansink’s Ladder: without numerous housemates’ dubious waste management practices to worry about, my residual bin seemed set to remain as sparsely populated as my unfurnished new home. However, I hadn’t counted on the arrival of fuzzy feelings of domesticity that led to the acquisition of an equally fuzzy companion. It wasn’t until my kitten was climbing around in my recycling bin that I started to realise just how much waste the little fellow was going to produce.

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January 31st, 2014

Goodbye, England’s rise: why have household recycling rates stalled?

Graph

by Roy Hathaway

 

One of the biggest questions facing UK waste policy makers and commentators is: why have recycling rates in England levelled off?

Until recently it was assumed – not least by Government – that the steady increase in UK recycling which marked the last decade would continue indefinitely, thanks mainly to the landfill tax escalator.

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