July 17th, 2015

Why don’t we implement the waste hierarchy?


by Dominic Hogg


Eunomia has been tracking capacity in both residual waste treatment facilities and at anaerobic digestion (AD) facilities in recent years. The lesson of the former is that we may be moving to a situation where we have more capacity than we need by the latter part of the decade. There have been a number of reports indicating the growth in this capacity. They don’t always come out with the same figures, and one of the reasons for this is that they posit different levels of recycling in future. In residual waste, we are dealing with material which it would be reasonable to assume will be diminishing over time if waste and resource management policy is successful.

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March 20th, 2015

Talking GIB-berish


by Dominic Hogg


We’ve now had more than two years of the Green Investment Bank (GIB), enough time to take a view on how green its intervention in the waste sector has been. It won’t be a surprise to hear that the answer is “not very”, but much more interesting to ask why.

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October 31st, 2014

Is separate food waste collection expensive?

Caddy stack

by Peter Jones


The Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee’s report on Waste management in England has been big news in waste this month, and by virtue of being a bit of a mixed bag most commentators have been able to find in it something to praise. The Committee had the unenviable job of trying to sift conflicting evidence from numerous interested parties, and perhaps it was inevitable that some of their recommendations would be in tension.

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May 27th, 2014

Withdrawal symptoms: why Defra still has a role in waste

Incin-Recyc Graph_SML

by Dominic Hogg


How is England performing on waste management, and what are the prospects for the future? Last year, Defra announced its intention to step back in areas of waste management where businesses are better placed to act and there is no clear market failure. Now the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (EFRA) Committee has launched an inquiry examining approaches to the recycling and treatment of municipal waste in England, and the impact of the reduction of Defra’s activities.

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February 7th, 2014

Don’t pooh-pooh pet waste

Recycling Cat crop

by Steve Watson


When I took my first step onto the property ladder last summer, I thought it would also help my ascent of Lansink’s Ladder: without numerous housemates’ dubious waste management practices to worry about, my residual bin seemed set to remain as sparsely populated as my unfurnished new home. However, I hadn’t counted on the arrival of fuzzy feelings of domesticity that led to the acquisition of an equally fuzzy companion. It wasn’t until my kitten was climbing around in my recycling bin that I started to realise just how much waste the little fellow was going to produce.

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January 31st, 2014

Goodbye, England’s rise: why have household recycling rates stalled?


by Roy Hathaway


One of the biggest questions facing UK waste policy makers and commentators is: why have recycling rates in England levelled off?

Until recently it was assumed – not least by Government – that the steady increase in UK recycling which marked the last decade would continue indefinitely, thanks mainly to the landfill tax escalator.

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January 24th, 2014

Difficult to digest: problems with the C&I food waste market


by Hattie Parke and Adam Baddeley


How well is the anaerobic digestion (AD) market developing in the UK? It’s a question that should concern not just investors and developers, but also policy makers and anyone else who wants to see more food waste treated higher up the waste hierarchy.

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