February 23rd, 2018

Avoidable confusion: the unwelcome return of TEEP

by Bethany Ledingham

 

The government’s long-awaited 25 year environment plan (25YEP) received a pretty lukewarm response when it was published in January: good as far as it went, but short on ambition, detail and money. Michael Gove may have outdone his predecessors by actually getting the 25YEP published, but it doesn’t seem that he managed to inject much new life into a document that Theresa May is said to have once ordered to be as boring as possible.

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February 2nd, 2018

Street smart: how can councils better tackle litter?

by Neil Greenhalgh

 

Walk down any street in Britain and you are likely to find litter: from crisp packets and drinks cans to fag-ends and chewing gum. I am still astonished by the audacity of people who clearly think unwanted confectionery and fast food packaging belong in a gutter or on a pavement. Allowing one’s dog to foul public spaces is another enviro-crime that too many people evidently find acceptable.

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January 26th, 2018

Fly-tipping in the face of the evidence

by Peter Jones

 

The number of fly-tipping incidents recorded by councils in England has gone up every year since 2012/13.  In 2016/17, the total number of fly-tips exceeded a million for the first time since 2008/09. Around two-thirds of incidents are classed as involving household waste; the number of such cases has increased by around 41% since 2012/13 so it’s natural to ask what changes might underlie this dramatic rise.

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December 18th, 2017

Are some countries cheating on their recycling rate?

Global Recycling Map

by Rob Gillies and Peter Jones

 

Eunomia recently published the second issue of ‘Recycling – Who Really Leads the World?’, a study that tries to compare on an equal footing the countries that claim the highest recycling rates in the world. It explains why comparing reported recycling rates at face-value is potentially misleading; and by producing more comparable figures, shines a light on those countries that are setting a positive example for others to follow.

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July 7th, 2017

Wheels of fortune: the story of the wheeled bin

by Steve Watson

 

For a relative newcomer to our streets and homes, the wheeled bin has come to occupy an important place in both British civic and cultural life. They have  helped change how waste is managed, and – whether as the subject of the Daily Mail‘s ire or being ridden down a dale by the cast of Last of the Summer Wine – media appearances have been frequent.

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June 30th, 2017

Is recycling confusing?

by Peter Jones and Joe Papineschi

 

There’s one thing everyone seems to agree on regarding recycling: it’s confusing. It’s a familiar complaint from countless press articles and broadcast pieces; when surveyed, people say they find recycling confusing; and Defra has taken up the theme. Part of the rationale for WRAP’s consistency programme is to ‘help address confusion’ by encouraging greater uniformity in councils’ recycling services.

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June 2nd, 2017

Myth takes: it’s greener to incinerate paper than recycle it

by Peter Jones

 

When people want to argue that this whole recycling lark has gone a bit too far, they often regurgitate a peculiar factoid: that, on a careful analysis of the pros and cons, incinerating waste paper and card to generate energy has greater environmental benefits than recycling it.

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