December 30th, 2015

The international Tidyman of mystery

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by Peter Jones

 

Everyone knows the Tidyman – he’s one of the most printed images in history, having appeared on all kinds of packaging all around the world for over half a century.

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November 20th, 2015

Separate biowaste collections: a TEEP learning curve?

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by Peter Jones

 

Details are starting to emerge of the forthcoming European Commission Circular Economy package proposal, now expected early in the New Year. If the leaks are accurate, and the package is translated into a directive in something like its current form, there will be a great deal of thinking to do – first for officials at Defra, and then for anyone involved in collecting waste that contains biowaste.

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October 2nd, 2015

On tape: regulation in the waste sector

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by Peter Jones

 

Last month, the Cabinet Office concluded its call for comments to help it “identify unnecessary barriers to growth and productivity in the waste sector”. I responded, as did many others in the sector, and judging by some of the comments posted on its web page I wasn’t alone in finding the red tape review somewhat misconceived. I would argue that the waste and recycling sector, far from being strangled by regulation and enforcement, relies upon it for its survival, let alone its growth.

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September 25th, 2015

Getting in on the ACT: subsidies and the EfW market

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by Chris Cullen

 

The market for residual waste treatment is about to experience some significant changes. As we move closer to the point where Eunomia’s Residual Waste Infrastructure Review forecasts suggest that the amount of treatment capacity will equal the amount of residual waste available, the key price benchmark for facilities will no longer be the cost of landfill. Instead, it will be the gate fee offered by operators of other residual waste treatment plant – many of them energy from waste (EfW) facilities. A key question for any developer, then, is what will allow a facility to be competitive over its lifespan of 25 years or more.

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August 7th, 2015

Crash and burn: what overcapacity means for UK EfW

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by Chris Cullen and Adam Baddeley

 

Many people in the waste sector have spent their careers managing seemingly ever-increasing quantities of residual waste. Efforts over the last fifteen years have focused on diverting it away from landfill. For those grappling with this problem, it can be difficult to believe that we’re rapidly approaching a point where we’ll be worrying about a lack of residual waste to feed the treatment facilities we’ve built to achieve this goal.

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July 3rd, 2015

Taking the wind out of electricity sales

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by Chloe Bines and Adam Baddeley

 

The new Conservative Government has wasted no time in implementing its manifesto pledge to end subsidies for onshore wind. Just six weeks into her tenure as Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, Amber Rudd announced that the Renewable Obligation (RO) would close a year early for onshore wind projects and strongly hinted that action would also be taken to curtail support for the technology under both the small-scale Feed-in Tariff (FiT) and the new Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme for larger scale projects. Meanwhile, the new Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Greg Clark, was busy announcing new planning considerations that will make it significantly harder for onshore wind projects to gain planning consent.

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June 26th, 2015

Can market forces alone create a circular economy?

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by Thomas Vergunst

 

In recent years the circular economy has emerged as something of a new Holy Grail for the resource sector. The European Commission has joined the quest and we currently await its revised circular economy package. In the literature, one frequently comes across the argument that a transition to a circular economy will be inevitable as businesses respond to rising commodity prices and increased price volatility, driven by rising demand coupled with resource scarcity. This, it is claimed, will start to make the business case for the circular economy increasingly self-evident.

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