March 24th, 2017

Throw away your chains: waste in food manufacturing

by Mark Hilton

 

Much of the UK’s efforts to address food waste have been directed towards retailers and householders. This focus is not without some justification: household food waste accounts for nearly half of the nearly 10m tonnes of post-farm gate food waste in the UK each year. However, that should not lead us to ignore the substantial amounts of waste arising from other parts of the food supply chain, where there are fewer individual actors to influence and perhaps greater scope for small, cost-effective changes that result in significant reductions in waste.

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January 20th, 2017

Should we be making a meal out of food waste?

by Jake Brown

 

We can all agree on one thing, that food waste is not good for the environment. But can it be ‘utilised’ to bring about social benefits to local communities?

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November 25th, 2016

Less rotting in the state of Denmark?

by Sarah Ettlinger

 

Copenhagen’s second ‘Wefood’ surplus food supermarket opened on Monday 7th November. Products in the shop are donated, for example due to damaged packaging or being close to or past best-before dates, and sold at 50-70% below the market price. The expansion builds on the success of the first Wefood, which received more than 25 tonnes of donations in the first three months after it opened in February. Both stores are run by DanChurchAid and staffed by volunteers.

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February 12th, 2016

Why are we still talking about landfill bans?

by Harriet Parke

 

For anyone attempting to keep abreast of waste issues, it can seem like it’s impossible to escape calls for banning certain materials – or all materials – from landfill. As someone with both a professional and personal interest in food waste, it’s a recurring theme I’ve become acutely aware of because it’s so prevalent in that part of the waste world.

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November 20th, 2015

Separate biowaste collections: a TEEP learning curve?

by Peter Jones

 

Details are starting to emerge of the forthcoming European Commission Circular Economy package proposal, now expected early in the New Year. If the leaks are accurate, and the package is translated into a directive in something like its current form, there will be a great deal of thinking to do – first for officials at Defra, and then for anyone involved in collecting waste that contains biowaste.

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August 28th, 2015

Waste hierarchy compliance: a tick box exercise?

by Sam Taylor and Peter Jones

 

The waste hierarchy is one of the fundamental elements of the European waste management policy. Enshrined in the Waste Framework Directive, and transposed into UK law in the Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2011 (‘the 2011 Regulations’), applying the waste hierarchy is a legal duty on all producers of waste. But with little threat of enforcement of this obligation, many businesses in the UK seem unmotivated to act and compliance appears to be literally no more than a tick box exercise.

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July 17th, 2015

Why don’t we implement the waste hierarchy?

by Dominic Hogg

 

Eunomia has been tracking capacity in both residual waste treatment facilities and at anaerobic digestion (AD) facilities in recent years. The lesson of the former is that we may be moving to a situation where we have more capacity than we need by the latter part of the decade. There have been a number of reports indicating the growth in this capacity. They don’t always come out with the same figures, and one of the reasons for this is that they posit different levels of recycling in future. In residual waste, we are dealing with material which it would be reasonable to assume will be diminishing over time if waste and resource management policy is successful.

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