February 2nd, 2018

Street smart: how can councils better tackle litter?

by Neil Greenhalgh


Walk down any street in Britain and you are likely to find litter: from crisp packets and drinks cans to fag-ends and chewing gum. I am still astonished by the audacity of people who clearly think unwanted confectionery and fast food packaging belong in a gutter or on a pavement. Allowing one’s dog to foul public spaces is another enviro-crime that too many people evidently find acceptable.

Read more on Street smart: how can councils better tackle litter?…

January 26th, 2018

Fly-tipping in the face of the evidence

by Peter Jones


The number of fly-tipping incidents recorded by councils in England has gone up every year since 2012/13.  In 2016/17, the total number of fly-tips exceeded a million for the first time since 2008/09. Around two-thirds of incidents are classed as involving household waste; the number of such cases has increased by around 41% since 2012/13 so it’s natural to ask what changes might underlie this dramatic rise.

Read more on Fly-tipping in the face of the evidence…

December 1st, 2017

Myth takes: the bin police

by Peter Jones


Are local authorities unjustifiably snooping on householders’ bins? Are they carrying out CCTV surveillance of people’s compliance with local bin rules? And are they looking to impose fines of thousands of pounds on people who break them?

Read more on Myth takes: the bin police…

September 22nd, 2017

Schedule 2 waste: are local authorities missing out?

by Joss Winter


This month, North Kesteven District Council in Lincolnshire is implementing new charges for what is still often referred to as “Schedule 2” waste. That’s the name given to waste from properties such as schools and care homes, which is classified as “household waste”, but which councils are allowed to charge for collecting. With many councils looking for every opportunity to raise revenues to fill the gap left by declining central government support, will other’s  be following suit?

Read more on Schedule 2 waste: are local authorities missing out?…

July 7th, 2017

Wheels of fortune: the story of the wheeled bin

by Steve Watson


For a relative newcomer to our streets and homes, the wheeled bin has come to occupy an important place in both British civic and cultural life. They have  helped change how waste is managed, and – whether as the subject of the Daily Mail‘s ire or being ridden down a dale by the cast of Last of the Summer Wine – media appearances have been frequent.

Read more on Wheels of fortune: the story of the wheeled bin…

June 30th, 2017

Is recycling confusing?

by Peter Jones and Joe Papineschi


There’s one thing everyone seems to agree on regarding recycling: it’s confusing. It’s a familiar complaint from countless press articles and broadcast pieces; when surveyed, people say they find recycling confusing; and Defra has taken up the theme. Part of the rationale for WRAP’s consistency programme is to ‘help address confusion’ by encouraging greater uniformity in councils’ recycling services.

Read more on Is recycling confusing?…

April 28th, 2017

Myth takes – “Separate streams need separate containers”

by Peter Jones


One of the recurring claims in the tabloid press coverage of waste and recycling issues is that if local authorities collect more separate streams of recycling, it means householders having to separate each waste stream into a different container. The view in the popular press is typically that, if householders have to do more source separation it will result in dissatisfaction, confusion, and more contaminated recycling. It’s a view that has little basis in reality.

Read more on Myth takes – “Separate streams need separate containers”…