October 3rd, 2014

Reverting to TEEP: more Waste Regulations quandaries

Sacks in London

by Peter Jones

 

The one commonly accepted fact about the Waste Regulations is that they aren’t well understood. Local authorities across England, Wales and Northern Ireland are grappling with the question of whether separate household collections of glass, metal, paper and card are “necessary” and “practicable”. In the absence of case law and with the Environment Agency only now starting to make clear how it will approach enforcement, these poorly defined concepts are far from easy to apply. But I’ve come across some interesting and difficult cases lately that help to reveal what the Regulations might mean in practice.

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August 29th, 2014

Wasted words: TEEP reviews need to be done properly

Cold Crosh bins

by Peter Jones

 

Can there still be anyone involved in managing local authority waste collection services that hasn’t heard the phrase TEEP? The requirement to collect four recyclable materials separately, where doing so is necessary and technically, economically and environmentally practicable, is one of the rare examples of a waste story that has crossed over into the mainstream press, albeit in the garbled form of stories about Europe requiring us all to have extra bins.

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July 1st, 2014

Manifesto destiny: waste policy in the 2015 election

Polling_Station_at_St_Faith

by Rob Gillies

 

A few weeks ago I was asked by MRW if I would provide some comments on what waste-related policies we might expect to see in the manifestos of the major political parties as we move towards the 2015 general election. This is what I wrote:

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May 27th, 2014

Withdrawal symptoms: why Defra still has a role in waste

Incin-Recyc Graph_SML

by Dominic Hogg

 

How is England performing on waste management, and what are the prospects for the future? Last year, Defra announced its intention to step back in areas of waste management where businesses are better placed to act and there is no clear market failure. Now the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (EFRA) Committee has launched an inquiry examining approaches to the recycling and treatment of municipal waste in England, and the impact of the reduction of Defra’s activities.

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May 22nd, 2014

Should the waste sector vote UKIP?

Better_Off_Out_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1164689

by Peter Jones

 

I wonder how much of the waste sector has read up on UKIP’s policies. UKIP’s rapid growth looks set to give it far greater representation in local government than ever before and its councillors will have correspondingly greater influence. So, what could this mean for waste?

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April 25th, 2014

It pays to think about trade waste

DSC_0188crop

by Peter Jones

 

What’s top of most local authorities’ priority lists at the moment? The cumulative effects of successive cuts to central government funding are bound to put budgetary concerns right up there. So why do so few councils closely scrutinise the budgetary performance of their commercial waste service?

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January 3rd, 2014

Paper cuts: is the iPad bad for recycling?

Old News

by James Fulford

 

Isonomia’s editor gave me a quick tour yesterday of the site’s December readership numbers. Amongst the predictable good news – the site has more than doubled in popularity in the last year – one stat in particular caught my eye: the blog had page impressions on December 25th!

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