July 20th, 2018

How long should things last?

by Marcus Valentine and Steve Watson

 

This article began with an Xpelair extractor fan, made in England in 1972, and 46 years later removed from Marcus’s kitchen. Already installed when he moved in a decade ago, it had presumably provided continual service since soon after it was manufactured before he took interest in how something so thoroughly covered in grease could still be soldiering on.

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April 13th, 2018

China crisis: what import restrictions mean for Europe

by Ad Lansink

 

Over recent years, the Chinese government became increasingly aware that solid waste being imported into China for recycling also contained large amounts of dirty and hazardous wastes. To ensure the health of its citizens and protect China against serious environmental pollution, in 2013 it launched ‘Operation Green Fence’, which stepped up container inspections with the aim of stopping shipments of illegal and low quality waste. This was followed in 2017 with operation ‘National Sword’, which specifically targeted imports of WEEE and industrial waste.

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February 23rd, 2018

Avoidable confusion: the unwelcome return of TEEP

by Bethany Ledingham

 

The government’s long-awaited 25 year environment plan (25YEP) received a pretty lukewarm response when it was published in January: good as far as it went, but short on ambition, detail and money. Michael Gove may have outdone his predecessors by actually getting the 25YEP published, but it doesn’t seem that he managed to inject much new life into a document that Theresa May is said to have once ordered to be as boring as possible.

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January 8th, 2016

Much wrong with Littlejohn

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by Peter Jones

 

The latest Daily Mail journalist to take a pop at the issue of how waste is managed in the UK was the unlikely figure of Richard Littlejohn – the vituperative columnist described by John Crace as “the stupid person’s Jeremy Clarkson”. His article is a blunderbuss assault on local authorities, whose bin collections he says have become “a perversion of public service where dustmen are the masters and we are the servants“. So zealous were his comments that the piece immediately spawned a rather brilliant Daily Mash parody.

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December 18th, 2015

Major third: a circular economy needs a new transition

by Ad Lansink

 

The proposals of the EU circular economy package (CEP) reveal that the waste hierarchy will retain a central place in the transition to a circular economy. The European Commission (EC) writes:

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July 17th, 2015

Why don’t we implement the waste hierarchy?

by Dominic Hogg

 

Eunomia has been tracking capacity in both residual waste treatment facilities and at anaerobic digestion (AD) facilities in recent years. The lesson of the former is that we may be moving to a situation where we have more capacity than we need by the latter part of the decade. There have been a number of reports indicating the growth in this capacity. They don’t always come out with the same figures, and one of the reasons for this is that they posit different levels of recycling in future. In residual waste, we are dealing with material which it would be reasonable to assume will be diminishing over time if waste and resource management policy is successful.

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April 10th, 2015

Transitioning to a circular economy

by Ad Lansink

 

For a society accustomed to the achievements of a linear economy, the transition to a circular system is a hard task even to contemplate. Although the changes needed may seem daunting, it is important to remember that we have already come a long way. However, the history of the waste hierarchy has taught that political perseverance and unity of approach are essential to achieving long term visions in supply chain management.

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