October 21st, 2016

Solar slow down

by Katharine Blacklaws

 

The need to decarbonise the UK’s electricity supply as part of efforts to mitigate the effects of potentially catastrophic climate change is now little disputed. The UK has several targets to cut its domestic emissions to achieve an 80% reduction based on 1990 levels by 2050.  This includes an interim target to source 30% of the UK’s electricity from renewable sources by 2020, as part of a wider 15% target for all forms of energy.

Read more on Solar slow down…


September 25th, 2015

Getting in on the ACT: subsidies and the EfW market

by Chris Cullen

 

The market for residual waste treatment is about to experience some significant changes. As we move closer to the point where Eunomia’s Residual Waste Infrastructure Review forecasts suggest that the amount of treatment capacity will equal the amount of residual waste available, the key price benchmark for facilities will no longer be the cost of landfill. Instead, it will be the gate fee offered by operators of other residual waste treatment plant – many of them energy from waste (EfW) facilities. A key question for any developer, then, is what will allow a facility to be competitive over its lifespan of 25 years or more.

Read more on Getting in on the ACT: subsidies and the EfW market…


December 5th, 2014

Is waste a source of renewable energy?

by Mike Brown

 

Whenever you look at material produced by the developers and users of energy from waste (EfW) incinerators, you soon come across the phrase “renewable energy”. Vince Cable used the term to describe a new incinerator in Lincolnshire just last week. On the websites of companies such as ViridorSITA, of councils from Glasgow to London, or of the Green Investment Bank, which has stepped in to fund several EfW projects – incineration is consistently referred to in the terms generally reserved for forms of energy such as wind, wave and geothermal.

Read more on Is waste a source of renewable energy?…


April 17th, 2014

Let’s make community energy EIS-y

640px-20110504-RD-LSC-0616_-_Flickr_-_USDAgov

by Jonathan Johns

 

Nobody could have mistaken Budget 2014 for the greenest budget ever. A few of the disappointments for those interested in promoting green energy were headline news, but others have taken a little time to emerge. For example, in the Overview of Tax Legislation and Rates document published alongside the budget, paragraph 1.59 stated:

Read more on Let’s make community energy EIS-y…


January 7th, 2013

CRC reform lets through a ray of light

Wind Turbine at Croda Chemical Works, Hull

by Jonathan Johns

 

One of the less remarked upon but highly significant changes announced in the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement was a simplification of the Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC). While the changes may appeal on the grounds of a claimed £272m reduction in compliance and reporting costs, they do nothing to stimulate renewed interest in on-site renewable energy generation by businesses, and need urgent revision if they are not to act as a disincentive.

Read more on CRC reform lets through a ray of light…


September 6th, 2012

Reshuffling the waste hierarchy

Owen Paterson

by Phillip Ward

 

It will no doubt take Owen Paterson a few days to uncover all the issues Caroline Spelman left in his in-tray.

One which has dipped under the radar is the promised revised guidance on applying the waste hierarchy.  Whilst it has been around for a long time, the hierarchy assumes greater significance now that the revised Waste Framework Directive gives its prioritisation of methods of waste treatment a statutory basis. Last year it was enshrined in England and Wales regulations that are now in force. Anyone creating or handling waste is already obliged to follow the hierarchy (Prevention, Preparing for Reuse, Recycling, Recovery or Disposal) and penalties can be imposed if they fail to do so. However, the guidance is a critical tool to enable the hierarchy to be applied in practice.

Read more on Reshuffling the waste hierarchy…


March 13th, 2012

ROC bands – just keep it simple

by Peter Jones OBE

 

In my experience, a uniting feature of governments of all political complexions is their capacity to base policy on fundamentally flawed assumptions, miss the overarching issues, and eschew sound science and rational economic models. DECC’s proposals on Renewable Obligation Certificate (ROC) Banding were a case in point, and the consultation, the results of which are due out this Spring, frustratingly allowed no scope to question the intellectual strength of the total package.

Read more on ROC bands – just keep it simple…