January 26th, 2017

What do Scots toss?

by Chris Sherrington

 

What are people most likely to litter? This is a surprisingly tricky question to answer, as the data on litter is poor. However, if we want to have effective policies to reduce littering, it’s important to understand the behaviours we need to change, and the scale of the impact they could achieve.

Read more on What do Scots toss?…


July 17th, 2015

Why don’t we implement the waste hierarchy?

by Dominic Hogg

 

Eunomia has been tracking capacity in both residual waste treatment facilities and at anaerobic digestion (AD) facilities in recent years. The lesson of the former is that we may be moving to a situation where we have more capacity than we need by the latter part of the decade. There have been a number of reports indicating the growth in this capacity. They don’t always come out with the same figures, and one of the reasons for this is that they posit different levels of recycling in future. In residual waste, we are dealing with material which it would be reasonable to assume will be diminishing over time if waste and resource management policy is successful.

Read more on Why don’t we implement the waste hierarchy?…


June 26th, 2015

Picking the right cherries: packaging waste and litter

by Chris Sherrington

 

Some time ago I came across an INCPEN press release entitled ‘Cherry-picking litter won’t work: It has to be all or nothing’. It reports findings of research conducted by Keep Scotland Beautiful and commissioned by INCPEN (The Industry Council for Research on Packaging and the Environment), whose members “include raw material suppliers, packaging manufacturers, and manufacturers and retailers of packaged products”.

Read more on Picking the right cherries: packaging waste and litter…


December 12th, 2014

Buyer beware: using procurement to root out waste crime

by Peter Jones

 

Waste crime has perhaps been the big resources sector issue to come to the forefront in 2014. It’s certainly the only aspect of waste that received a particular mention in the Chancellor’s budget – not even Landfill Tax managed that – and has also been given prominence by Radio 4’s File on 4 series. That’s all good profile, and the £5m that George Osborne found to tackle this criminality is no doubt being put to good use by the Environment Agency.

Read more on Buyer beware: using procurement to root out waste crime…


January 24th, 2014

Difficult to digest: problems with the C&I food waste market

by Hattie Parke and Adam Baddeley

 

How well is the anaerobic digestion (AD) market developing in the UK? It’s a question that should concern not just investors and developers, but also policy makers and anyone else who wants to see more food waste treated higher up the waste hierarchy.

Read more on Difficult to digest: problems with the C&I food waste market…


January 17th, 2014

Picking up the evidence: what’s the cost of litter?

640px-Walkers_Crisps

by Chris Sherrington

 

Is all this concern about litter overblown? Does government really need to intervene to reduce levels of litter, or is it just a distraction from more urgent issues? What are the negative effects of litter and how significant are they; and given the range of apparently competing pressures, what is a policymaker to do?

Read more on Picking up the evidence: what’s the cost of litter?…


November 26th, 2013

Written in haste, repented at leisure?

Dan Rogerson

by Phillip Ward

 

I wonder if Dan Rogerson – the new waste and resources minister – will come to regret the letter he sent to industry stakeholders this month.

In some ways it is encouraging that he was honest in explaining the constraints of money and people that Owen Patterson’s decisions have left for his part of the Defra brief. It is both refreshing and unusual for government ministers to be clear about their priorities – or more particularly what they are not going to do. The temptation to appease interest groups by over-promising is not often resisted: after all few ministers, especially in this portfolio, stay long enough to be called to account for commitments they make but don’t deliver.

Read more on Written in haste, repented at leisure?…