February 24th, 2017

Separate ways: a commercial waste case study

by Nick Stott and Peter Jones

 

It’s now a little over two years since the separate collection requirements under the amended Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2011 took effect. For waste collectors, this made it compulsory to ensure that, if they were collecting paper, metals, plastics or glass, they did so by way of separate collection – subject to the rather hard to interpret condition that separation is ‘necessary’ and ‘practicable’ (‘TEEP’).

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November 20th, 2015

Separate biowaste collections: a TEEP learning curve?

by Peter Jones

 

Details are starting to emerge of the forthcoming European Commission Circular Economy package proposal, now expected early in the New Year. If the leaks are accurate, and the package is translated into a directive in something like its current form, there will be a great deal of thinking to do – first for officials at Defra, and then for anyone involved in collecting waste that contains biowaste.

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October 2nd, 2015

On tape: regulation in the waste sector

by Peter Jones

 

Last month, the Cabinet Office concluded its call for comments to help it “identify unnecessary barriers to growth and productivity in the waste sector”. I responded, as did many others in the sector, and judging by some of the comments posted on its web page I wasn’t alone in finding the red tape review somewhat misconceived. I would argue that the waste and recycling sector, far from being strangled by regulation and enforcement, relies upon it for its survival, let alone its growth.

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August 28th, 2015

Waste hierarchy compliance: a tick box exercise?

by Sam Taylor and Peter Jones

 

The waste hierarchy is one of the fundamental elements of the European waste management policy. Enshrined in the Waste Framework Directive, and transposed into UK law in the Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2011 (‘the 2011 Regulations’), applying the waste hierarchy is a legal duty on all producers of waste. But with little threat of enforcement of this obligation, many businesses in the UK seem unmotivated to act and compliance appears to be literally no more than a tick box exercise.

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October 3rd, 2014

Reverting to TEEP: more Waste Regulations quandaries

Sacks in London

by Peter Jones

 

The one commonly accepted fact about the Waste Regulations is that they aren’t well understood. Local authorities across England, Wales and Northern Ireland are grappling with the question of whether separate household collections of glass, metal, paper and card are “necessary” and “practicable”. In the absence of case law and with the Environment Agency only now starting to make clear how it will approach enforcement, these poorly defined concepts are far from easy to apply. But I’ve come across some interesting and difficult cases lately that help to reveal what the Regulations might mean in practice.

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August 29th, 2014

Wasted words: TEEP reviews need to be done properly

Cold Crosh bins

by Peter Jones

 

Can there still be anyone involved in managing local authority waste collection services that hasn’t heard the phrase TEEP? The requirement to collect four recyclable materials separately, where doing so is necessary and technically, economically and environmentally practicable, is one of the rare examples of a waste story that has crossed over into the mainstream press, albeit in the garbled form of stories about Europe requiring us all to have extra bins.

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April 25th, 2014

It pays to think about trade waste

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by Peter Jones

 

What’s top of most local authorities’ priority lists at the moment? The cumulative effects of successive cuts to central government funding are bound to put budgetary concerns right up there. So why do so few councils closely scrutinise the budgetary performance of their commercial waste service?

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